Entries by Cayley

AircoD.H.2

The D.H.2 was a compact, little fighting scout that served Britain’s Royal Flying Corps ( RFC) well in the fieree air battles over the Somme in 1916. Designed by Geoffrey de Havilland of the Aircraft Manufacturing Company (Airco). it was developed from the larger D.H.1. A pusher propeller was set behind the wings, leaving a free field of fire for the Lewis […]

Lockheed Vega

The stylish Lockheed Vega was a charismatic aircraft that scored high on both looks and performance. Designed by Jack Northrop for the Lockheed Aircraft Company, it was a fast, high-winged monoplane with room for six passengers. The Vega owed its exceptionally clean lines to its smooth semi monococque plywood fuselage, built in two halves in a concrete mould, and its cantilever wing free […]

McDonnell Douglas DC-10

Held in affectionate regard by pilots and engineers, the DC-10 was “fun to fly, roomy, and quiet”. Yet this impressive pioneer of the three-engined, widebody airliner endured troubled beginnings. A series of accidents in the 1970s and 80s had unfortunately tarnished its reputation; however, only one of these accidents was due to a design deficiency, and this had been rectified in most DC -1 […]

Boeing 767

The workhorse of the transatlantic route, the Boeing 767 also claims the curious merit of being the world’s most slender widebody. It made its mark on commercial aviation by pioneering the now-routine Extended Twin Operating Procedures (ETOPS). ETOPS is an International Civil Aviation ruling permitting twin-engined commercial aeroplanes to fly routes that, at some points, are more than 60 minutes flying time from an […]

Saunders-Roe Princess

The epitome of those large, elegant commercial flying boats that had reigned supreme on intercontinental air routes in the 1930s, the Saunders-Roe Princess had the misfortune to be born into a postwar world whose requirements had changed. Certainly, the aircraft had ample power, with ten Bristol Proteus turboprop engines installed as coupled pairs in each of the four inboard nacelles, and as single […]

Paulhan-Tatin Aero-Torpille

One of the more conspicuous machines at the French military aeroplane trials in October 1911 was the Paulhan-Tatin Aero- Torpille (acro-torpedo). It was designed by veteran flight experimenter Victor Tatin, and built by Louis Paulhan, then France’s most famous young aviator. This happy collaboration of youth and age produced a sleek, streamlined monoplane that was in some ways ahead of its time. […]

Fokker Dr.I Triplane

A potent little fighter, the Fokker Dr.I triplane proved itself a deadly opponent of Allied scouts, especially in the hands of such master pilots as the legendary “Red Baron”, Manfred von Richthofen. However, the aircraft was dogged by structural weaknesses and, in many ways, was outperformed by its contemporaries. The Dr.1 began as an attempt to replicate Britain’s Sopwith Triplane. Anthony Fokker’s company […]

Supermarine S.6B

In the 1920s mihI early 1930s seaplane racers were the fastest aircraft on the planet. Built purely for speed, entrants for the biennial Schneider Trophy contest were at the cutting edge of progress in streamlining, high-performance engines, and high-octane fuels, Britain won the trophy in 1927 and 1929 with sleek Supermarine monoplanes designed by Reginald Mitchell. For the 1931 contest, Supermarine adapted their 1929 winning […]

Farman III Biplane

The slow but dependable Farma III was the classic pre-World War I biplane,sold around the world. Its creator, Henry (or Henri) Farman, was of English parentage but lived all his life in France. He began his aviation career flying a Voisin hox-kite biplane. After modifying this machine extensively, including fitting ailerons, he used it to make the world’s first true crosscountry flight, […]