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1

Heinkel He 178

The Heinkel He 178 was the world’s first aeroplane to fly purely on turbojet power. It was mi experimental prototype built to test feasibility of the jet engine developed by Dr Hans von Ohain. Apart from its powerplant, it was a conventionally designed, small monoplane with a duralumin fuselage and a mainly wooden wing. The engine’s air intake was located in the nose. […]

2

Sopwith Camel

The famous Sopwith F.1 Camel destroyed more German aircraft than any other World War I fighter, although it also had an unfortunate reputation for killing its own pilots. It was named for the “hump” over the two Vickers machine guns mounted in front of the cockpit. The aircraft was powered hy a rotary engine, and engine, armament, and pilot were all concentrated at the […]

3

Gloster-Whittle E.28/39

The Gloster-Whittle E.28/39 was the first jet aeroplane to fly in Britain. II was built to test the viability of the turbojet engine invented by Flight Lieutenant Frank Whittle. Apart from its powerplant the aircrafl, designed by George Carter of Gloster Aircraft, was thoroughly conventional. It was a compact all-metal single-seater with a monococque fuselage, a low wing, and a short, retractable tricycle […]

4

Radley-England Water Plane

Designed and built in Britain by James Rladley and Eric Gordon England, the Waterplane was the world’s first tri-motor aeroplane. Its three 50-hp rotary engines were mounted between the wings. each engine had its own controls and an independent chain drive linking it to the propeller shaft above. Together the engines drove a large fourbladed pusher propeller. The aircraft was sizeable […]

5

Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe

The shark-like Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe was the world’s first operational jet fighter. Powered by two Junkers Jumo engines mounted under its slightly swept-back wings, it was at least 70mph faster than any World War II piston-engine aircraft. German pilot, Adolf Galland, described the exhilarating experience of flying the jet as like being “pushed by angels”. Unfortunately for the Luftwaffe, the development […]

6

Ryan NYP

In 1927 airmail pilot Charles Lindbergh decided to compete for a $25.000 prize offered for the first person to fly non-stop between New York and Paris. Ryan Airlines of San Diego, California, agreed to build him an aeroplane in 60 days for $6.000 ($10,580 with the engine included). The New-York-to-Paris (NYP) aircraft was based on Ryan’s M.2 high-wing monoplane, but was specially adapted to accommodate greatly […]

7

Polikarpov I-16

The Soviet Union’s I-16 Ishak (“Little Donkey”) was the world’s first single-seat, low-wing cantilever monoplane fighter with a retractable undercarriage – the formula that was to dominate the remainder of the piston-engine era. Remarkably, its designer, Nikolai Polikarpov, worked as a prisoner in Stalin’s Gulag, having been denounced for “sabotage” over alleged slow progress in aircraft development. The I-16 was one of […]

8

Pilcher Triplane

Fllight pioneer Percy Pilcher is one of Britain’s unsung heroes. But for a fatal accident it is possible that he, rather than the celebrated Wright brothers, might have solved the riddle of powered, controlled, heavier-than -air flight. Inspired by Lilienthal, Pilcher built four gliders in 1895, the last of which, the Hawk, was the most successful. In 1897, working with engineer Walter Wilson, he […]

9

Hawker P.1127

During the postwar period aircraft manufacturers around the world wrestled with t he knotty problem of vertical take-off and landing (VTOL). The usefulness of a winged aircraft that could operate from a car park or a forest clearing was obvious, but how to design one was certainly not. An extraordinary variety of configurations was tested – including a number of “tail-sitters” […]

10

North American P-51 Mustang

Ultimately the greatest long-range fighter of World War II, the P-51 Mustang took some time to find its war-winning final shape. Designed in 1940 to meet an urgent British requirement for an airecraft to equip RAF Fighter Command, it initially proved a partial failure. The advanced laminar-flow wings and streamlined all-metal fuselage made the aircraft fast in low-level flight, but its […]